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2017 JULY ICELAND, STEINAR TO HAFNARFJORDUR

RING ROAD DAY 7 STEINAR TO HAFNARFJORDUR VIA THE GOLDEN CIRCLE

overcast

DAY 158 THURSDAY 13TH JULY 2017

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Our last day driving in Iceland, and we woke to still overcast but non raining skies. We started the day with a surprise included breakfast, did not show on the booking, so an added bonus.

We are making our way back to the beginning today via the Golden Circle. These are the only few sights that most visitors to Iceland manage to see in their 2-3 day stopover. Where we have included them in our Ring Road lap of the country.

Of course our last day we again saw magnificent scenery. Doesn't seem to matter where you look in this country it's all pretty magnificent. That is why I have not written much of a commentary for any of the days as the country really does speak for itself. Only a few photos in these blogs but please go to my facebook photo albums for many, many more pictures.

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Our first stop on the Golden Circle was Gullfoss - the biggest waterfall we have seen in Iceland.

Gullfoss is a waterfall located in the canyon of the Hvítá river in southwest Iceland. Gullfoss is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Iceland. The wide Hvítá rushes southward, and about a kilometre above the falls it turns sharply to the right and flows down into a wide curved three-step "staircase" and then abruptly plunges in two stages into a crevice 32 metres deep. The crevice, about 20 metres wide and 2.5 kilometres in length, extends perpendicular to the flow of the river. The average amount of water running down the waterfall is 140 cubic metres per second in the summer and 80 cubic metres per second in the winter. The highest flood measured was 2,000 cubic metres per second.

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Our next stop was in Geysir, and here is a bit of trivia for you all:
Geysir, sometimes known as The Great Geysir, is a geyser in southwestern Iceland. It was the first geyser described in a printed source and the first known to modern Europeans. The English word geyser derives from Geysir. The name Geysir itself is derived from the Icelandic verb geysa, "to gush", the verb from Old Norse. Geysir lies in the Haukadalur valley on the slopes of Laugarfjall hill, which is also the home to Strokkur geyser about 50 metres south.

We did not see The Great Geysir erupt, but we did see the Stokkur geyser a few times. Also hot steam vents all over the place.

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Our last stop was Almannagia.
Canyon Almannagja in Iceland - the seam between the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates.

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Today we drove 290km.

Posted by Cindy Bruin 12:20 Archived in Iceland

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