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2017 JULY ICELAND, HVAMMSTANGI to LONSA

RING ROAD DAY 2 APPROX 200KM HVAMMSTANGI TO LONSA

sunny

DAY 154 SUNDAY 9TH JULY 2017

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The plan was to get up at about 8 and be on the road at about 9ish, but that didn't happen. No-one set an alarm, so we had a late breakfast and left Hvammstangi at about 10.30am.

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We again drove through some magnificent scenery again today. The sun was out all day, but the temp was lower than yesterday and each time we exited the warmth of the car we needed to put on a jacket, and hat, and scarf.

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A banana break stop.
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We only had about 200km to travel today, so a side trip detour off Highway One was taken to visit some turf houses in Glaumbaer.

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Icelandic turf houses (Icelandic: torfbæir) were the product of a difficult climate, offering superior insulation compared to buildings solely made of wood or stone, and the relative difficulty in obtaining other construction materials in sufficient quantities.
30% of Iceland was forested when it was settled, mostly with birch. Oak was the preferred timber for building Norse halls in Scandinavia, but native birch had to serve as the primary framing material on the remote island. However, Iceland did have a large amount of turf that was suitable for construction. Some structures in Norway had turf roofs, so the notion of using this as a building material was not alien to many settlers.
The common Icelandic turf house would have a large foundation made of flat stones; upon this was built a wooden frame which would hold the load of the turf. The turf would then be fitted around the frame in blocks often with a second layer, or in the more fashionable herringbone style. The only external wood would be the doorway which would often be decorative; the doorway would lead into the hall which would commonly have a great fire. Another interesting aspect of the Icelandic turf house was the introduction of attached toilets, which were communal, and the act of going to the attached toilet was often done in large groups. The floor of a turf house could be covered with wood, stone or earth depending on the purpose of the building. They also contain grass on their roofs.

We took the long way back to re-join Highway One, stopping for a sandwich picnic lunch with a view.

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The rest of the afternoon we drove north and again, still witnessed some magical scenery.

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A quick visit to the supermarket for some dinner supplies before checking into our accommodation at about 4.30pm. We just relaxed for the rest of the afternoon/evening. Lyn cooked spag bol for dinner, thank god for share kitchens.

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I went for a quick walk around outside before dinner and discovered we were surrounded by snow capped mountains.

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Another great day in Iceland.

Today we drove 261km.

Posted by Cindy Bruin 17:18 Archived in Iceland

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